COVID-19 Vaccine Update

We previously discussed the rapidness in which the COVID-19 vaccine was created and explained all steps have been taken to ensure its safety and effectiveness. However, many are still left wondering! Here are new developments since the vaccine was first administered at the beginning of this year:

  • The 1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1, B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants circulating in the United States are classified as variants of concern. Based on current data, the B.1.1.7 variant is the most common variant across the country.
  • Recent data suggest that the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States right now offer protection against most variants currently spreading in the United States.
  • Evidence is limited on how the new COVID-19 variants will affect how COVID-19 vaccines are working. However, the CDC is continuing to monitor how vaccines are working to see if variants have any impact on how well COVID-19 vaccines work.

The most important take-away being – the process it took to create the COVID-19 vaccine so quickly. The government financially aided pharmaceutical companies so developers could solely focus on the COVID-19 virus. Vaccines aim to expose the body to antigen that will not cause the disease but will provoke an immune response that can kill the virus if the body become infected.

mRNA vaccines are a new type of vaccine to protect against infectious diseases. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies. Researchers have been working with and studying mRNA for decades. DNA and RNA can be thought of as cousins. The way the vaccine works is our cells are made up from messenger RNA. The vaccines make a spike in proteins in our bodies. Large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for three COVID-19 vaccines, one of which is Moderna’s mRNA-1273 COVID-19 vaccine.

Along with the CDC, we recommend getting a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it is available to you so you can protect yourself and others.

For more information on COVID-19 vaccines visit henryjaustin.org/covid-19-vaccine-explained/.

This information was originally posted on cdc.gov.

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